Creative Commons License Image thumbnails on this page and the full-size images they link to are licensed under a Creative Commons License (Free for non-commercial use with attribution; Ask me about other uses).

Modular Origami — 3D anaglyph images

These are 3D anaglyph images of different modular origami models. Red-cyan glasses are required for proper viewing. Each image was generated from two photographs taken with a digital camera and combined using Make Anaglyph script-fu plugin for The GIMP. The offset between images when taking pictures was determined by intuition with no helper devices used.

I feel that regular flat images of modular origami (many of which you can find on this site, too) often do a poor job of showing a model's real character. Especially complex origami solids tend to become just puzzling patches of different colors on two dimensional photographs. They do so much more than traditional origami models because threedimensionality is inherent to their design and their abstract form makes it harder for the viewer to recognize 3D cues from the image. Therefore, despite all shortcomings of anaglyph images, I think they can enhance the experience in interesting ways and provide additional useful information to the viewer. This could come in handy especially if you want to recreate a model based on its picture. Even basic depth perception helps better understand the folding process. On the other hand, at least with this particular 3D technology, I find three-dimensional pictures to be complementary to regular, flat images, but in no way capable of replacing them.

Models folded and photographed by Michał Kosmulski. Modules designed by their respective authors.
Click on images to enlarge them. Links in image titles lead to pages with more information about each particular object.

3D anaglyph: Gasherbrum — 4 intersecting triangles

Gasherbrum (four intersecting triangles, 4 × 3 × 1)

Model and units designed by Robert Lang (instructions in PDF linked from that page), 12 units.
[ 2D image ]

3D anaglyph: octahedron - Pyramid Vertex Module (PVM), inverted asembly and sunken unit variant used

Octahedron

Made from the sunken variant of Michał Kosmulski's PVM (Pyramid Vertex Module), inverted unit assembly (14 modules: 8 sunken vertex units and 6 connector units).
[ 2D image ]

3D anaglyph: Makalu — 6 intersecting pentagons

Makalu (six intersecting pentagons, 6 × 5 × 1)

Model and units designed by Robert Lang, 30 units. Instructions available in Origami USA Annual collection 2002.
[ 2D image ]

3D anaglyph: Annapurna — 10 intersecting triangles, Sturdy Edge Module (StEM)

Annapurna (ten intersecting triangles, 10 × 3 × 1)

Model designed by Robert Lang, but this one is made from Michał Kosmulski's Sturdy Edge Module (StEM) instead of Robert Lang’s units (30 units, 4:1 paper).
[ 2D image ]

3D anaglyph: spiked dodecahedron - modified 60 degree module

Spiked dodecahedron

Made from a modified version of Francis Ow's 60 degree module (scroll down the linked page for original unit folding instructions) (30 modules).
[ 2D image ]

3D anaglyph: greater stellated icosahedron (stellated dodecahedron) - super simple isosceles triangle module

Great stellated icosahedron (stellated dodecahedron)

Made from M. Mukhopadhyay's super simple isosceles triangle module (module also attributed to Jeannine Mosely and Roberto Morassi) (30 modules).
[ 2D image (different coloring) ]

3D anaglyph: spiked icosahedron - custom module

Spiked icosahedron

Made from custom modules (30 modules).

3D anaglyph: Five intersecting tetrahedra (FIT) - 60 degree module

Tom Hull's Five intersecting tetrahedra (FIT)

Made from Francis Ow's 60 degree module (30 modules).
[ 2D image and notes about folding ]

3D anaglyph: Five intersecting tetrahedra (FIT) - 60 degree module
3D anaglyph: 5 intersecting tetrahedra (FIT) - 60 degree module
3D anaglyph: 5 intersecting tetrahedra (FIT) - 60 degree module
3D anaglyph: truncated octahedron - modified 60 degree module

Truncated octahedron with inverted spikes on all faces

Made from a modified version of Francis Ow's 60 degree module (scroll down the linked page for original unit folding instructions) (36 modules).
[ 2D image and notes ]

3D anaglyph: spiked pentakis dodecahedron - Simple Edge Unit (Sonobe-like variant)

Spiked pentakis dodecahedron

Made from Michał Kosmulski's Simple Edge Unit (SEU), Sonobe-like variant made of square paper (60 modules).
[ 2D image ]

3D anaglyph: 14-spoked wheel (tetradecagonal prism) - Sturdy Edge Module

14-spoked wheel (tetradecagonal prism)

Made from Michał Kosmulski's Sturdy Edge Module (StEM) (70 modules: 28 from 1:2√2 paper and 42 from 1:√2 paper).
This construction isn’t mathematically exact but is close enough for practical purposes.
[ 2D image ]

3D anaglyph: Abstract composition “T” - Building Block Unit (BBU)

Abstract composition “T”

Made from Michał Kosmulski's BBU (Building Block Unit) (75 modules: 36 × A1, 30 × A2, 6 × D1, 3 × E4).
[ 2D image ]

3D anaglyph: buckyball (90 edges) - PHiZZ variant 1

Buckyball (90 edges)

Made from a variant of Thomas Hull's PHiZZ unit (90 modules).
[ 2D image ]

3D anaglyph: decorated rhombicuboctahedron - penultimate module

Decorated rhombicuboctahedron

Made from Robert Neale's penultimate module (120 modules).
[ 2D image ]

3D anaglyph: Menger sponge from from public transport tickets - business card cube module

Menger Sponge (level 1)

Made from Business card cube module (192 modules: 120 for the body and 72 for coating).
Public transport tickets were used for the units.
[ 2D image ]

3D anaglyph: buckyball (210 edges) - PHiZZ variant 3

Buckyball (210 edges)

Made from a variant of Thomas Hull's PHiZZ unit (210 modules).
[ 2D image ]

3D anaglyph: Hamiltonian cycle of the cube - Building Block Unit (BBU)

Hamiltonian cycle of the cube

Made from Michał Kosmulski's BBU (Building Block Unit) (240 modules: 144 × A1, 96 × E1 variant).
[ 2D image ]

3D anaglyph: Level 2 Menger sponge - business card cube module

Menger Sponge (level 2)

Made from Business card cube module (3456 modules: 2400 for the body and 1056 for the outer shell).
[ 2D image ]


From the homepage of Michał Kosmulski, http://michal.kosmulski.org/
Unless indicated otherwise, all content © 2004-2016 Michał Kosmulski. All rights reserved.