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Origami — Corrugations

Models folded and photographed by Michał Kosmulski. Authors of the particular corrugation designs are listed near each picture (most are my own designs, though).
Click on images to enlarge them.

Origami corrugation: At the Mountains of Madness

At the Mountains of Madness

A free-form origami corrugation folded from a strip of Jet Black Canford Paper. Named after a novella by H.P. Lovecraft. The crooked lines also somewhat resemble the expressionist sets of The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari.

[ discuss on flickr ]

Iso-area diamond Corrugation

Iso-area Diamond Corrugation

The original Diamond Corrugation was invented independently by Ilan Garibi and Andrea Russo (who used the name Triangùli in speculo).

I thought I’d make an iso-area version since I haven’t seen anyone publish such a modification yet despite its obviousness. I guess someone must have come up with this idea before, but I just couldn´t find any pictures. According to Ekaterina Lukasheva, there was a curvilinear version designed by David Huffman.

Just like many other iso-area designs, this one also has the nice property of not rolling up: since both sides are same (iso-area), there is no tension difference between the two.

[ discuss on flickr ]

Vase Corrugation

Vase Corrugation

Origami corrugation with an outline of a vase. The creases are all visible so there’s no need to even use a CP if you want to reproduce this pattern :)

[ discuss on flickr ]

Darth Vader Corrugation

Darth Vader Corrugation

This origami mask is also a corrugation at the same time (single layer of paper almost everywhere). Very simple: just make an 8×8 grid, add a few diagonal creases and you’re done. Designed and folded by Michał Kosmulski.

[ discuss on flickr ]

Tympanum Corrugation (iso-area)

Tympanum Corrugation, iso-area variant

Iso-area variant of my Tympanum Corrugation. Since both sides are the same, there is no net tension and the model stays flat without trying to curl up.

[ discuss on flickr ]

Tympanum Corrugation — close-up

Tympanum Corrugation

A new origami design of mine, called Tympanum Corrugation because it resembles the tympanum of a Greek temple. The idea came to me after I designed this dog house — this corrugation is just the roof, repeated side by side as a tessellation.

This model has a slight tendency to curl, but an iso-area variant is possible which lacks the tension of the basic variant and can lay completely flat.

[ discuss close-up on flickr ]
[ discuss top-down view on flickr ]

Tympanum Corrugation — top-down view
Chevron Corrugation (iso-area variant) — close-up

Chevron Corrugation, iso-area variant

This is a variant of my chevron corrugation in which every other row of chevrons is reversed, i.e. pointing down instead of up. This makes the corrugation iso-area, i.e. both sides look the same. It also removes the tension which causes the basic version to curl: this variant can be spread as narrow or as wide you like without curling.

Designed and folded by myself, the basic variant of this corrugation was invented independently by Daniel Kwan before me, and his work in turn was based on an industrial design by Charles Hoberman.

[ discuss close-up on flickr ]
[ discuss top-down view on flickr ]

Chevron Corrugation (iso-area variant) — top-down view
Chevron Corrugation — close-up

Chevron Corrugation

Corrugation, designed and folded by me, but later I learned that Daniel Kwan folded this pattern before, inspired by a similar model by Charles Hoberman (details here).

[ discuss close-up on flickr ]
[ discuss top-down view on flickr ]

Chevron Corrugation — top-down view
Double-Blintzed Bird Base Corrugation — top-down view

Double-Blintzed Bird Base Corrugation

After tessellating the blintzed bird base, a natural next step for me was to double-blintz it. Bird base blintzed two times can be tessellated and it results in a more interesting pattern than the singly-blintzed variant. The pattern is significantly different on both sides.

This corrugation was folded from Japanese Tsumugi paper. Even for my standards, this paper is very thick (140 gsm) and doesn’t seem suitable for folding anything but corrugations. However, its color is very saturated and it has a beautiful texture which is supposed to resemble the traditionally woven tsumugi fabric.

[ discuss top-down view on flickr ]
[ discuss close-up on flickr ]
[ discuss back view on flickr ]
[ discuss CP pre-creased paper on flickr ]

Double-Blintzed Bird Base Corrugation — close-up
Double-Blintzed Bird Base Corrugation — back
Double-Blintzed Bird Base Corrugation — folded pre-creased crease pattern
Blintzed Bird Base Corrugation — close-up

Blintzed Bird Base Corrugation

This corrugation is exactly what it says on the tin: blintzed bird bases tiled side by side. Large tilings have a slight tendency towards curling but it can be overcome by folding all creases sharp and applying a little force in the direction opposite of the curl. Folded the right size, this corrugation could be used as an egg carton or as a set of small containers for screws, nails, candy or other small objects.

Designed and folded by me.

[ discuss close-up on flickr ]
[ discuss top-down view on flickr ]
[ discuss back view on flickr ]

Blintzed Bird Base Corrugation — top-down view
Blintzed Bird Base Corrugation — back
Radial Zig-Zag Tessellation

Radial Zig-Zag Tessellation

This is a rather obvious variant of the classic Zig Zag Corrugation, so it’s certainly been done by others before. This model was mostly free-folded with only the radial lines folded to exact angles.

Acryl on Elephant Hide paper.

[ discuss on flickr ]

Ruff Corrugation

Ruff Corrugation

A very simple design, so it’s probably been invented before. Inspired by the pineapple tessellation and its variants. Paper aspect ratio of approximately 5:1.

[ discuss on flickr ]

Hugging Triangles Corrugation

Hugging Triangles Corrugation

At first sight you might see only octagons and squares in this corrugation. But in my opinion the interesting part is the small triangles placed pairwise in the squares’ corners. When the paper is relaxed, you can see S-shaped forms there, but when the model is squeezed, the triangles become more obvious and they look as if each pair was intersecting. My design.

First version is folded from Tant paper, the other was executed in fabric-covered Elephant Hide paper with a foil backing.

[ discuss the fold in Tant paper on flickr ]
[ discuss the fold in fabric on flickr ]

Hugging Triangles Corrugation folded in fabric

See also:

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